Bennett’s Wallaby

Bennett’s Wallaby

Macropus rufogriseus fructicus
Bennett’s Wallaby at Tayto Park

About Me

Bennet Wallabies are also known as the Red-Necked Wallaby, Scrub Wallaby, and many other local names. Like other wallabies they belong to the same family as kangaroos, known as macrapods. Bennett's Wallabies are semi-solitary, spending time in small groups that change often.They are most active at dusk and dawn. Bennett's Wallabies travel like all members of the macrapod family, by hopping. A group of wallabies is known as a ‘mob’. Males are known as ‘boomers’ or ‘jacks’, females as ‘flyers’ or ‘jills’, and young as ‘joeys’.

Bennett’s Wallaby
 

Reproduction:

Marsupial gestation period is very short (only 30 days). Females will give birth to under-developed or altricial young that will remain in the pouch for 280 days. The under-developed young of marsupials depend on mother’s milk for a very long lactation period. Young will continue to nurse until they are 12-17 months old.

Conservation Status:

Least Concern

LC Least Concern NT Near Threatened VU Vulnerable EN Endangered CR Critically Endangered EX Extinct

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Conservation at Tayto Park

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